endorse


endorse
01. You need to [endorse] this check before you can cash it.
02. Michael Jackson used to [endorse] Pepsi in a number of advertisements.
03. The policies [endorsed] by this party seem to be quite unpopular with the general public.
04. There are a number of celebrity [endorsements] in Japan which feature well-known American movie stars.
05. The thief was arrested at a local bank when he tried to [endorse] a check made out to someone else.
06. I don't understand why super-rich celebrities choose to make product [endorsements] to make even more money.
07. This product is [endorsed] by leading environmental groups as being safe for our environment.
08. Historians have discovered that ancient Roman gladiators, as a result of their immense public appeal, performed product [endorsements].
09. The President's new economic plan has been [endorsed] by both business and labor.
10. Because humans create religion in their own image, it is inevitable that religion leans toward personal and societal [endorsement], rather than personal and societal judgment.
11. Under the Canadian political system, the Senate's powers are largely limited to delaying the [endorsement] of legislation passed by the House.
12. The Democratic candidate for President has been [endorsed] by a number of well-known celebrities.
13. Tiger Woods is paid over 40 million dollars for product [endorsements], and appearances in ads for Nike.
14. In March of 1973, a new constitution for the country of Syria was [endorsed] by over 97 percent of voters in a national referendum.
15. In October of 1997, the President of Cuba, Fidel Castro, [endorsed] his brother Raul to succeed him when he dies.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • endorse — en·dorse also in·dorse /in dȯrs/ vt en·dorsed also in·dorsed, en·dors·ing, also, in·dors·ing [Anglo French endosser endorser and Medieval Latin indorsare, both ultimately from Latin in on + dorsum back] 1: to write on the back of; esp: to sign… …   Law dictionary

  • Endorse — En*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Endorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Endorsing}.] [Formerly endosse, fr. F. endosser to put on the back, to endorse; pref. en (L. in) + dos back, L. dorsum. See {Dorsal}, and cf. {Indorse}.] Same as {Indorse}. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endorse — (v.) late 14c. endosse alteration, from O.Fr. endosser (12c.), lit. to put on back, from en put on (see EN (Cf. en ) (1)) + dos back, from L. dossum, variant of dorsum. Sense of confirm, approve (by signing on the back) is recorded in English… …   Etymology dictionary

  • endorse — [v1] support, authorize accredit, advocate, affirm, approve, attest, authenticate, back, back up*, bless, boost, certify, champion, commend, confirm, countenance, defend, favor, give a boost to, give green light*, give one’s word*, give the go… …   New thesaurus

  • endorse — [en dôrs′, indôrs′] vt. endorsed, endorsing [altered (after L) < ME endosen < OFr endosser < ML indorsare < L in, on, upon + dorsum, the back] 1. to write on the back of (a document); specif., a) to sign (one s name) as payee on the… …   English World dictionary

  • Endorse — En*dorse , n. (Her.) A subordinary, resembling the pale, but of one fourth its width (according to some writers, one eighth). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endorse — *approve, sanction, accredit, certify Analogous words: vouch, attest, *certify, witness: *commend, recommend: *support, uphold, champion, back, advocate Contrasted words: *disapprove, deprecate: condemn, denounce, reprobate, reprehend, censur …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • endorse — in its modern marketing meaning ‘to give one s approval to (a product)’ was labelled by the Concise Oxford Dictionary in 1914 as ‘vulgar in advertisements’. Its original meaning is ‘to write on the back of (a document)’, from Latin dorsum ‘back’ …   Modern English usage

  • endorse — (US & Law also indorse) ► VERB 1) declare one s public approval of. 2) sign (a cheque or bill of exchange) on the back to specify another as the payee or to accept responsibility for paying it. 3) Brit. enter an endorsement on (a driving licence) …   English terms dictionary

  • endorse — Transferring asset ownership by signing the back of the asset s certificate. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary * * * endorse en‧dorse [ɪnˈdɔːs ǁ ˈdɔːrs] also indorse verb [transitive] 1. LAW …   Financial and business terms

  • endorse — [[t]ɪndɔ͟ː(r)s[/t]] endorses, endorsing, endorsed 1) VERB If you endorse someone or something, you say publicly that you support or approve of them. [V n] I can endorse their opinion wholeheartedly. [V n] ...policies agreed by the Labour Party… …   English dictionary